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Saint Lucia

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A tiny island but oh so beautiful. In the middle of the Caribbean Sea and part of the Windward Islands. Perhaps still completely unknown to most travelers and that's a good thing. The independent island state of Saint Lucia is such a gem that you prefer to keep to yourself. Close to Saint Vincent and Martinique, it has been a point of contention between the English and French for centuries. A warlike past includes piracy, sandy beaches with palm trees and picturesque resorts, remote rustic fishing villages, a mountainous jungle with strange animals and plants, banana plantations, unlimited fruit food, and above all a breathtakingly beautiful underwater landscape.

Volcanic Island

Saint Lucia's capital is Castries, a cozy town located on the sea. The small towns of Soufrière, Gros Islet and Vieux Fort are also pleasant places to stay. The island has a coastline of 158 km and is about three times the size of Texel. The island consists mainly of volcanic rock and is mountainous. The climate is tropical. The minimum temperature is usually around 24 degrees.

Tropical rainforest

Nature is quite diverse for such a small island. The tropical rainforest and highlands are home to various animals such as iguanas, bats, opossums and many bird species. A dip in the Caribbean Sea may bring you an encounter with lobsters, turtles, dolphins, marines and barracudas.

Capital Castries

Saint Lucia belongs to the southern Lesser Antilles, and is one of the Windward Islands – located between Martinique and Saint Vincent (both of which are visible in clear weather!). In 1979 Saint Lucia became an independent state, before that it had been a British colony for a century and a half.

In the century and a half before that, the island of Saint Lucia changed hands no fewer than 14 times – between the British and the French – because the island is strategically located, and Castries also has a good, sheltered harbor. The French time is still ringing though. Not only do many villages have French names, but the language and food are laced with French influences.

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